What Are The Major Causes Of Posterior Calcaneal Spur

Calcaneal Spur

Overview

A heel spur is a painful condition that is caused by the accumulation of excessive calcium under the heel of the foot. The heel bone is made up of a large structure called the calcaneus, which is connected to the bottom of the foot by durable connective tissue called fascia. If the layers of connective tissue become damaged or begin to degenerate due to wear and tear, plantar fasciitis may develop. This causes calcification, which refers to the abnormal buildup of calcium on the heel bone. As the calcium continues to accumulate, a calcified protrusion called a spur may become visible on an X-ray.

Causes

Heel spurs are common in patients who have a history of foot pain caused by plantar fasciitis. In the setting of plantar fasciitis, heel spurs are most often seen in middle-aged men and women, but can be found in all age groups. The heel spur itself is not thought to be the primary cause of pain, rather inflammation and irritation of the plantar fascia is thought to be the primary problem. A heel spur diagnosis is made when an X-ray shows a hook of bone protruding from the bottom of the foot at the point where the plantar fascia is attached to the heel bone.

Calcaneal Spur

Symptoms

An individual with the lower legs turning inward, a condition called genu valgus or “knock knees,” can have a tendency toward excessive pronation. This can lead to a fallen arch and problems with the plantar fascia and heel spurs. Women tend to suffer from this condition more than men. Heel spurs can also result from an abnormally high arch. Other factors leading to heel spurs include a sudden increase in daily activities, an increase in weight, or a thinner cushion on the bottom of the heel due to old age. A significant increase in training intensity or duration may cause inflammation of the plantar fascia. High-heeled shoes, improperly fitted shoes, and shoes that are too flexible in the middle of the arch or bend before the toe joints will cause problems with the plantar fascia and possibly lead to heel spurs.

Diagnosis

A thorough history and physical exam is always necessary for the proper diagnosis of heel spurs and other foot conditions. X rays of the heel area are helpful, as excess bone production will be visible.

Non Surgical Treatment

Rest your foot. Reduce the amount of weight-bearing activities you participate in. Get off of your feet and elevate them. This will allow healing to begin. Apply ice to your foot. Applications of ice packs that provide a comfortable cooling to the heel and arch (not a freezing cold) will help reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation. Apply the ice to the heel and arch (not the toes). Make sure it is comfortable, and leave on your foot for about 20 minutes, 3 times a day. If you have any medical problems such as diabetes, poor circulation, etc., discuss the use of ice with your doctor before applying the ice. Active Wrap allows you to apply comfortable cold therapy to your foot without messy ice cubes. Use while on the ?go.? Do not walk with bare feet. Always protect your heels, arches, and plantar fascia with good supportive shoes. Vionic Orthotic Flip Flops For Men and Women are designed for walking comfort with built in orthotic foot beds that help reduce foot pain from heel spurs. Use in the house or on the beach.

Surgical Treatment

Surgery to correct for heel spur syndrome is a common procedure which releases plantar fascia partially from its attachment to the calcaneous (heel bone). This part of the surgery is called a plantar fasciotomy due to the fact the fascia is cut. This is most often done through an open procedure as any heel spur or bursa can be removed at the same time. If the spur is not removed during the surgery, it will probably be just as successful, as the large spur is not the true problem. Some physicians use an endoscopic approach (EPF) where a small camera aids the physician during surgery with typically smaller incisions on each side of your foot.

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What Is A Heel Spur

Inferior Calcaneal Spur

Overview

The heel spur (or calcaneal spur) is a nail-like growth of calcium around the ligaments and tendons of the foot where they attach to the heel bone. The spur grows from the bone and into the flesh of the foot. A heel spur results from an anatomical change of the calcaneus (heel bone). This involves the area of the heel and occasionally, another disability, such as arthritis. The heel bone forms one end of the two longitudinal arches of the foot. These arches are held together by ligaments and are activated by the muscles of the foot (some of which are attached beneath the arches and run from the front to the back of the foot). These muscles and ligaments, like the other supporting tissues of the body, are attached in two places. Many are attached at the heel bone. The body reacts to the stress at the heel bone by calcifying the soft tissue attachments and creating a spur.

Causes

A heel spur can develop when there is an abundance of calcium creating a deposit in the calcaneus, or heel bone. Over time, this deposit grows to create an outcropping under the heel that extends into the foot. The result is a protrusion that leads to foot pain when pressure is applied, and in some cases, even during rest.

Inferior Calcaneal Spur

Symptoms

Heel spur is characterised by a sharp pain under the heel when getting out of bed in the morning or getting up after sitting for a period of time. Walking around for a while often helps reduce the pain, turning it into a dull ache. However, sports, running or walking long distance makes the condition worse. In some cases swelling around the heel maybe present.

Diagnosis

Your doctor will review your medical history and examine your foot. X-rays are used to identify the location and size of the heel spur.

Non Surgical Treatment

Heel spurs are considered a self-limited condition, which means that by making small alterations in your lifestyle and regular routines you can often control the condition. The goal is to relieve pain, reduce friction and transfer pressure from your sensitive foot areas. By eliminating the cause of the heel spur and plantar fasciitis (i.e. better shoes, orthotics to fix your gait, losing weight) will help reduce the pressure put on your fascia and heel and can reduce the inflammation caused by your heel spur. Failure to see improvements after conservative treatments may make surgery your only option.

Surgical Treatment

Surgery, which is a more radical treatment, can be a permanent correction to remove the spur itself. If your doctor believes that surgery is indicated, he will recommend an operation – but only after establishing that less drastic methods of treatment are not successful.

Prevention

If you have not yet developed this condition, you can take steps to protect yourself from it. Most importantly, make it a rule to wear properly fitted footwear. Avoid shoes that have become worn down in the heel, and don’t choose shoes that cause you to walk in an abnormal fashion. Maintaining a healthy weight will ensure that undue pressure isn’t being put on the ligaments, tendons and bones of your feet. If your job requires a great deal of time on your feet, or if you exercise regularly, be sure to balance periods of activity with periods of rest for your feet.

What Are Heel Spurs?

Bone spurs are the body’s response to stressful conditions. They are caused by pressure, wear and tear, or osteoarthritis. When an area of bone such as the knee or shoulder undergoes a lot of stress or rubbing, or if the cartilage becomes thin, a bone spur may develop in an attempt to relieve the stress. Heel spurs are bone spurs that occur on the heel bone (calcaneus bone). The Achilles tendon is connected to the back of the heel bone. If the Achilles tendon becomes chronically inflamed (tendonitis), heel spurs may develop at the back of the heel bone.

You should consult your doctor immediately if you are unsure of the causes of heel pain when running. Running with heel pain can prove harmful, and may lead to complications. Silicone heel cups, leather heel pads, contrasting cold and hot therapy generally help accelerate the healing process. You can return to running thereafter. Take care of your feet sincerely as they bear the weight of your body and help you move. Repeat this process, overlapping a second piece of adhesive tape above the first wrapping, toward the top of your foot. Overlap the tape so half the width of the initial wrapping is covered. Step 5

Sometimes the problem happens due to the use of improper footwear rather shoes, because it does not provide proper support to your foot. In that case you should try heel spur cushions; it’s a kind of a pad that can be put in your shoes. It provides custom support and it’s made up of shock absorbing polymer. The fist thing that you should do is rest your foot. Avoid any activities that can make the symptoms worse so no exercise or prolonged standing. If possible, you should stay off your feet completely for a couple of days. This will help the inflammation to subside a little bit.heel spur surgery recovery

Aren’t heel spurs and plantar fasciitis the same thing? Approximately 10% of people with plantar fasciitis do develop heel spurs. These result from calcium deposits related to chronic inflammation. Most people with plantar fasciitis, however, do not have heel spurs, and many people with heel spurs seen on x-ray do not have plantar fasciitis. In any case, treatment of plantar fasciitis is directed toward the inflammation and predisposing factors, rather than toward the spur itself. Attach the adhesive tape to the outside edge of your foot behind your little toe. Guide and attach the tape along the outside edge of your foot until you reach your heel. Step 2

While you can follow certain self-care measures, it is always better to consult a doctor. Besides conducting a physical examination and analyzing the symptoms, doctors may also order an X-ray to determine the extent of the damage. It’s important to determine if it’s the heel spur that has fractured or one has suffered from a calcaneal bone fracture. If the X-ray reveals a fractured calcaneal spur, doctors might recommend surgery as a part of the calcaneal fracture treatment. After undergoing surgery, patient will need to take all possible precautions to speed up recovery process.

As with any kind of bone bruise or contusion, a bruised heel results in extreme pain symptoms. However, heel pain may be caused due to various conditions. So, identify a bruised heel by holding the affected area gently, and pressing it lightly at the center with the thumb. If a sharp, excruciating pain is felt with increased pressure, then most likely it is a bruised heel problem. Pain is due to the forceful impact of the feet with a hard surface, which in turn causes minor fractures to the heel bone.

Plantar fascia injuries can also occur at the midsole or near the toes. Since it is difficult to rest the foot, the problem gradually worsens and is aggravated with every step. In severe cases, the heel is visibly swollen. The problem may progress rapidly, and treatment must be started as soon as possible. Improvement and pain relief may take longer than expected, especially if the condition has existed for a long time. As the injury begins to heal, the athlete should return to full activity gradually. If you feel pain in your feet when walking, running, or positioned for a extended time, you may have developed a heel spur

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